Throwback Thursday
Tree planting on a rainy day at the University of Washington.
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Throwback Thursday

Tree planting on a rainy day at the University of Washington.

Syracuse University has been designated a Tree Campus USA for two years. SU’s grounds department maintains more than 683 acres of landscape.
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Syracuse University has been designated a Tree Campus USA for two years. SU’s grounds department maintains more than 683 acres of landscape.

      Trees: Nature's Water Filter? UT-Knoxville Study Hopes to Prove So

Tree Education Tuesday

      Tropical Countries' Growing Wealth May Aid Conservation | Duke Environment

Tree Education Tuesday

“Our research suggests that as incomes rise in these countries, it creates a new opportunity for domestic funding to play a larger role in supporting efforts to protect forests and forest species from logging, poaching and other threats.” Jeffrey R. Vincent, a Duke environmental economist, said. “This could make a big difference in protecting tropical biodiversity and reducing greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation and forest degradation.”

Delaware State University, Toyota agree hands-on sustainability education essential

By: Stacie Sikora

Throughout the years sustainability has become an increasingly important issue on campuses nationwide. With the increased concern comes an increase in opportunities for students to get involved in making their campus – and the world – a more sustainable place. Delaware State University, the only historically black university and only recognized Tree Campus USA® school in Delaware, is one of those campuses that has made sure sustainability education and hands-on experience are accessible to its students.

“I didn’t have these types of opportunities when I was in college,” DSU alumnus and Toyota Financial Services Corporate Manager John Ridgeway said. “I walk around the campus today, which I graduated from in 1975, and it’s exciting for me and very inspirational to see this type of commitment.”

When it comes to education, the Claude E. Phillips Herbarium offers classes on plants, trees and sustainability, including master gardener training.

Beyond courses, students can get involved in the herbarium and arboretum by becoming a student worker or a student representative on the Campus Tree Advisory Committee.

“They’re doing hard work and learning a lot at the same time,” herbarium professor Susan Yost said.

Hands-on learning through the Tree Campus USA program is one of the main goals of the partnership between the Arbor Day Foundation and Toyota.

“The values (of DSU’s president, Dr. Williams, and Toyota) are aligned. One of the goals Dr. Williams said that stuck with me is to make lives easier in the environment that we serve and the environment we reside. That’s one of our core values as well and one of my corporate responsibilities,” Ridgeway said.

Tree education can go outside of traditional sustainability and horticultural learning. Yost has led tours through the herbarium and arboretum for literature classes learning about romantic poets. Nature inspired the romantics’ writings and continues to inspire writers today. Yost stresses the importance of tree conservation and preservation for literary growth.

“Campuses should be a part of Tree Campus USA because everyone has more involvement,” Yost said. “Their hearts are really in it. There are more people planting every year, which will lead to more programs.”

Throwback Thursday

Photo from a 2010 Tree Campus USA planting event at the University of Pennsylvania.

Whole album here.

      BU Leads Study That Shows Surprising Spread of Spring Leaf-Out Times | Boston University

Tree Education Tuesday

“Leaf-out phenology affects a wide variety of ecosystem processes and ecological interactions and will take on added significance as leaf-out times increasingly shift in response to warming temperatures associated with climate change,” the study said.  “There is, however, relatively little information available on the factors affecting species differences in leaf out phenology.”