Fun Facts:
- Duke University has been designated a Tree Campus USA for six years. 
- Duke has taken a number of initiatives toward becoming a more sustainable campus. In addition to campus efforts, Duke collaborated with NC State University and the NC Division of Forest Resources to achieve sustainable forestry certificates for 55,000 acres of forest in North Carolina.

Photo by Lana Dyck
ZoomInfo
Camera

Kodak P850 Zoom Digital Camera

ISO

50

Aperture

f/2.8

Exposure

1/60th

Focal Length

7mm

Fun Facts:

- Duke University has been designated a Tree Campus USA for six years.

- Duke has taken a number of initiatives toward becoming a more sustainable campus. In addition to campus efforts, Duke collaborated with NC State University and the NC Division of Forest Resources to achieve sustainable forestry certificates for 55,000 acres of forest in North Carolina.

Photo by Lana Dyck

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It’s the third anniversary of Green Apple Day of Service today!

 Green Apple Day of Service is a movement to put students in schools with clean, healthy air to breathe and where energy and resources are conserved. Improve your school by applying for Tree Campus USA® recognition this fall. Check out project ideas at mygreenapple.org/projects.

Join the Tree Campus USA Celebrate Arbor Day Event Contest

Want to do something new and exciting to engage your campus community in the celebration of Arbor Day this year?  Join the Tree Campus USA Celebrate Arbor Day event contest to do just that!   

Up to 10 winners will be selected to receive $500 toward the purchase of trees or tree-related materials, 2 Tree Campus USA banners, 5 Tree Campus USA yard signs and 30 Tree Campus USA T-shirts and hats to give away for hosting an Arbor Day celebration in spring 2015.

The contest is open to 2013 Tree Campus USA recognized colleges and universities.  

Learn more and join today!

   

Students, families to combat cankerworms on annual day of service

NC State professor Dr. Steve Frank, right, and  university arborist Mark Davin wrap a tree with cankerworm banding.

Orginally posted at: http://sustainability.ncsu.edu/uncategorized/students-families-to-combat-cankerworms-on-annual-day-of-service

This year NC State’s annual Parents and Families Weekend service project isn’t about planting trees; it’s about saving them.

From 9 – 10:30 a.m. on Sunday, Sept. 21, up to 75 students, parents and family members will attach specially-designed bands to about 80 campus trees that are most vulnerable to cankerworms, a small but mighty pest that wreaks havoc on N.C. trees.

“Cankerworms have become more and more abundant,” said Steve Frank, an NC State associate professor of entomology. “In Raleigh it’s getting worse and worse, and [combating cankerworms] is important to preserving urban trees and forests.”

As the first phase of the band application, volunteers will wrap and attach about six inches of polyfill fabric and special paper around tree trunks. Later in the fall just before cankerworms begin climbing trees, the university will slather the bands with Tanglefoot, a sticky paste of natural resins, oil and wax that traps female moth worms so they can’t lay eggs in tree branches. This helps reduce caterpillar abundance and damage while also preventing future infestations.

“We’ll be helping to prolong the life and health of trees,” said Susan Grant, Director of University Housing.

The impact of cankerworms near campus is clearly seen in this defoliated tree on the right as compared to a healthy tree.

This year’s project is a departure from the traditional Parents and Families Weekend service project that has typically involved planting new campus trees, shrubs or other landscaping features. A partnership of University Housing, Parents & Families Services, Design and Construction Services, Student Leadership and Engagement, and the Department of Entomology, this year’s service project will help campus while also educating participants about tree preservation.

“This project not only protects our trees on campus, it also provides a great learning opportunity for our parents and families,” said Stacy Fair, Director of Parent, Family and Visitor Services.“After participating in this project they will be equipped with the knowledge to go back home and protect their own trees.”

Fun Facts:
- U-M was the first university to be recognized as a Tree Campus USA and has received designation for the last six years. 
- U-M has more than 16,000 trees spread across its four campuses. 
- The central campus alone has more than 1,200 trees.

Photo by Missy Caulk
ZoomInfo
Camera

SONY DSC-H50

ISO

100

Aperture

f/5.6

Exposure

1/400th

Focal Length

5mm

Fun Facts:

- U-M was the first university to be recognized as a Tree Campus USA and has received designation for the last six years.

- U-M has more than 16,000 trees spread across its four campuses.

- The central campus alone has more than 1,200 trees.

Photo by Missy Caulk

      Is there a deforestation limit we can aim for? - University of Washington

Tree Education Tuesday

Deforestation is bad, according to just about everybody in the world who isn’t actively engaged in cutting down a tree right now. It isn’t a controversial position to say that we should save our rain forests and other major wooded areas, but it also isn’t a particularly useful one. A more interesting question to answer is exactly how much is too much when it comes to deforestation: Just as the world has coalesced around doing our best to hold global warming under two degrees C from preindustrial levels, is there some amount of forest that we really must keep in order to keep the ecosystems at least somewhat intact?

Fun Facts:
- The University of Florida received Tree Campus USA designation for the first time in 2013. 
- The campus is adorned with more than 1,200 trees. 
- UF’s efforts to become more sustainable have made them an Audubon International Cooperative Sanctuary.

Photo by Random McRandom
ZoomInfo
Camera

Kodak Cx4300 Digital Camera

ISO

100

Aperture

f/8

Exposure

1/142th

Focal Length

7mm

Fun Facts:

- The University of Florida received Tree Campus USA designation for the first time in 2013.

- The campus is adorned with more than 1,200 trees.

- UF’s efforts to become more sustainable have made them an Audubon International Cooperative Sanctuary.

Photo by Random McRandom